The Dancer Stereotype

 We can all picture the stereotypical dancer in our minds, but the truth is that anyone can dance.

We can all picture the stereotypical dancer in our minds, but the truth is that anyone can dance.

"Studies show dancing improves mood, cognitive skills, balance and agility." These are results according to research found from the Albuquerque Journal. It's safe to say that everyone wants to stay in shape, feel good, and have fun. Dance shouldn't be the last thing to come to mind to achieve this combination. Anyone can dance. Really. Everyone starts somewhere and this is only the beginning to the journey of passion, happiness, and positivism.

Television and YouTube can really intimidate with the many talented dancers seen doing the seemingly impossible. Lifts, splits, jumps, spins, going so fast that you can't keep up. This can bring discouragement. People want to find something that suites them, to wash out any negativity, but then compare themselves to others and end up feeling worse than before because now there's this burning image in their minds of what a dancer is supposed to be, do, or look like. However, just because that's their pace doesn't mean everyone's is. Those dancers are more than likely professionals who have been working their whole life in this field, and at one point they started with a basic box step in ballroom dancing, too.

Everyone has been a beginner. The important thing is to do what you love and have fun. Dance is a great activity to get others involved in too. You can bring a friend, relative, or co-worker. The sky is the limit. Don't let an idea of what you have to be keep you from living a dream. All it requires is the effort. No more no less. Before you know it you'll be reaping the incredible results of a sharpened, relaxed mentality and toned figure.

For more information, contact us, at Quick Quick Slow Ballroom Dance Studio